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Author Topic: Do you or don't you think that a classless skill system is a good idea? Why?  (Read 6583 times)

uexilon

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Actually, this question can't be answered because a classless Skillsystem can be way better than the other. BUT it has to be written and tested very well.

Something special about the classless-system can be, that skills are not limited to certain classes but to a certain amount of Players. If the balancing is done well, it is possible to have Extremly strong or special Skills without risking an imbalanced system. What can a single player with a very very special Skill do, when he has to fight against 4 or 5 Players? So %tual (to the amount of players) limited Skills would give strenght but those Players will be known after a few Days and they will just be attacked by more than one or two Players.

If we go a step further and limit the possibility to own those "strong" Skills to one or two, the system would balance it self and it would make each Character unique. A Character that is different to any other. It's a dream of each gamer isn't it?
« Last Edit: Jan 10, 12, 06:49:34 AM by uexilon »
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jjfmarine

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Out of all the systems, the classless or "skill based" system is the most realistic of all the systems. Work on something, get better at it. I beleive the system would work, but the skills need to be immersive, and draw the character into the game. The skills need to be a time commitment and give a good reward- per time given.
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PN-Dwight

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In addition to the things said (skimming over the posts), a classless system can also greatly increase game-time overall, if the learning is linked. (I know some things about a lot, but only know a lot about some things, and it would be harder for me to learn completely new things)

It would thus become easy to learn a bit about everything, but it would take many more hours of gameplay to learn everything to the max. In my/our project, there is learning by doing, and your character "learns" by how many times he used something, which is not influenced by character level (although there is a small correlation between the two). Once the character learns more about the different abilities that he can have, combinations between the abilities can be learned (thus: max_ability1 + max_ability2 = new_move ==> Max fire + max wind = fire-tornado; or more common "str + sword_skill = dual wielding")

Disadvantages are of course that people, once maxed out all skills, may look quite identical with skills;  there thus has to be a system with RL-player-skills (like button-mashing, or actual aiming, intelligence) with which people can differentiate themselves. However, it takes a much longer time now to max out all of your abilities, skills and professions.

Conclusively, a classless system has quite the advantages with regards to game-time and player interest, but a disadvantage to complexity and realism (realism = complexity = lots of calculations => Optimizations.)

ProjectDiomedes

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From my perspective, as a long time player and theorist on gaming in general, the biggest problem to a completely open class system is content design in an MMO.  It's not hard to have a completely open class system in a small game with only a dozen or so players since the designers are able to know their players and design content around that small group of players.  But a dozen or so players does not an MMO make. 
My observation on open vs Classess systems in MMO's is that as long as you keep content designed for solo play or small group play, 4 or so players in a group, keeping encounters challenging isn't too difficult.  The real content problem becomes in larger group activities and raids.  It's nearly impossible to project what the skill make up of these larger groups will be, which makes designing larger group content exponentially more difficult.  At least if you want to keep the encounters difficult, but not so difficult that they can't be overcome unless "just the right sets of skills" happen to be present.

Which presents the second problem, players identifying each other as needed components in a raid or group type environment so that they can get the "proper" mix of skill sets present.  And the more variety of skills that are made available to players the more difficult this problem becomes.  You can't have too few skills or there's no point in having a open class system, but too many skill types and it becomes extremely difficult for players to find the right mix.  this latter tends to lead to more clique based groups and makes pick up groups nearly impossible on a larger scale endeavor. 

That's not to say there aren't ways to work around these issues, there are, but they involve a lot of creativity, and balance.  So in the end it really depends on what type of game you want to produce as to how well a classless system works.  If you design a game that's primarily going to be soloing or duoing, or PVP action then a classless system actually works better in the long run, in my opinion.

Personally I'm a fan of semi-open classed game design.  But that's another story.
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